A British father’s agony as he is rescued from the ocean after three days but his 14-year-old son drowned

A 14-year-old Dutch boy who disappeared while diving off Malaysia on Wednesday after being ‘abandoned’ by his captain on methamphetamine drowned before rescuers could reach him, his son has revealed. heartbroken British father.

Nathen Renze Chesters was swept out to sea with his shell engineer father Adrian Peter Chesters, 46, Frenchwoman Alexia Alexandra Molina, 18, and their Norwegian instructor Kristine Grodem, 35.

The Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency today revealed Mr Chesters told them his son had become too weak to stay afloat and had drowned.

The agency has asked Indonesian authorities to continue searching for the body as the rescue mission to Malaysia has been called off.

The group of four were in waters around 15 meters deep on an island off the town of Mersing in southern Johor state.

Mr Chesters and Ms Molina were found by rescuers and a fisherman early on Saturday morning in waters near the Indonesian border and taken to hospital, where they are reported to be in stable condition.

They were found 16 nautical miles (30 kilometers) north of the Indonesian island of Bintan, about 70 nautical miles (100 kilometers) from where they went missing on Wednesday, according to the police chief of Mersing, Cyril Edward Nuing.

Ms Grodem was first rescued by a tug on Thursday.

It comes after the captain of the boat carrying the group was arrested for further investigation on Thursday over fears he may have abandoned them at sea after testing positive for methamphetamine.

Police said they would assess the diving equipment and location, adding that the captain was being investigated under section 15(1) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.

He is also charged with negligence.

Tragic: 14-year-old Dutch boy Nathen Renze Chesters, who disappeared while diving off Malaysia on Wednesday after being ‘abandoned’ by his captain taking methamphetamine, drowned before rescuers could can reach him, said his father

Adrian Peter Chesters

Alexia Alexandra Molina

Adrian Peter Chesters (pictured left), 46, and Alexia Alexandra Molina (pictured right), 18, were found early on Saturday in waters near the Indonesian border and taken to hospital, the report said Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency.

Malaysia's Maritime Enforcement Agency today revealed Mr Chesters (pictured) told them his son had become too weak to stay afloat and had drowned

Malaysia’s Maritime Enforcement Agency today revealed Mr Chesters (pictured) told them his son had become too weak to stay afloat and had drowned

Mersing District Police Chief Cyril Edward shows pictures of two divers found alive, French national Alexia Alexandra Molina (right) and British national Adrian Peter Chesters (left)

Mersing District Police Chief Cyril Edward shows pictures of two divers found alive, French national Alexia Alexandra Molina (right) and British national Adrian Peter Chesters (left)

Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) officers during their search and rescue operation for foreign divers off Johor's Mersing, Malaysia

Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) officers during their search and rescue operation for foreign divers off Johor’s Mersing, Malaysia

Instructor Ms Grodem, 35, was rescued by a tug on Thursday.

She said the four of them surfaced safely on Wednesday afternoon, but then drifted away from the boat and were separated by a strong current.

The search moved south to where the two divers were found, Mersing maritime chief Khairul Nizam Misran said.

Two planes, nine boats and some 85 staff plus fishermen are involved in the expanded search, he said.

The captain of the boat has been arrested for further investigation and diving activities off Mersing have been suspended.

Officers from the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) are seen at the search and rescue operations command center for missing divers in Mersing, Johor, Malaysia on Saturday morning

Officers from the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA) are seen at the search and rescue operations command center for missing divers in Mersing, Johor, Malaysia on Saturday morning

The island where they disappeared, Pulau Tokong Sanggol, lies about 15 km off the Malaysian coast.

The island where they disappeared, Pulau Tokong Sanggol, lies about 15 km off the Malaysian coast.

Officials say the four, who were in the water for 40 minutes,

Officials say the four, who were in the water for 40 minutes, “failed to return after undergoing a dive drill”. Pictured: The tugboat that found Norwegian diver Kristine Grodem

Ms Grodem was training the other three, who were seeking advanced diving licenses, maritime officials said.

Local officials had hinted they were confident the three missing people would be found because they were “experienced divers”.

Chesters, who is from Sheffield, had only recently moved his family to the tourist hotspot after working as the lead engineer behind Shell’s highly successful Appomattox rig in the Gulf of Mexico.

District Police Chief Cyril Edward Nuing said Thursday: “Based on her [Grodem’s] account, the other three managed to surface.

“With their equipment, full gear and experience, we believe there is a good chance of finding them alive.”

It comes after the captain of the boat was detained for further investigation after being arrested for testing positive for drugs.

Johor Police Chief Datuk Kamarul Zaman Mamat said officers arrested the man at 11:30 p.m. on Thursday after giving a statement to Mersing district police.

Mr Mamat said: ‘He tested positive for methamphetamine use when we did a urine test.

The forensic team will arrive to investigate. We will also investigate if there is a problem of negligence.

The area the group originally disappeared from is popular with divers and tourists, with dozens of resorts dotted around the coastal area.

Dive instructor Kristine Grodem, 35, (pictured), was found 30 nautical miles from where she was last seen  She and the group were diving off the small island of Pulau Tokong Sanggol, nine miles from the coast, before disappearing on Wednesday.

Dive instructor Kristine Grodem, 35, (pictured), was found 30 nautical miles from where she was last seen She and the group were diving off the small island of Pulau Tokong Sanggol, nine miles from the coast, before disappearing on Wednesday.

Diving accidents, although rare, do occasionally occur in Malaysia.

In 2013, a British tourist died when she was struck by the propeller of a passing boat as she dived off islands in the South China Sea.

The tropical Southeast Asian nation’s white-sand beaches and lush rainforests have long made it a major draw, but the tourism industry has been hit hard by travel restrictions during Covid.

Malaysia’s borders reopened to foreigners on April 1 after being closed for more than two years during the pandemic.


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